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201 engine assembly

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littlemarv View Drop Down
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    Posted: 02 Feb 2016 at 10:23pm
Thought I would start a new topic just for the engine portion of my WC resurrection.

Start with a nice clean line bored block, sitting on my tractor table downstairs behind the furnace, where I can work day or night in a climate controlled environment.



How am I going to get a complete engine out of my basement, you ask? Don't worry, we'll cross that bridge (or, climb those stairs, when we get to it).

Lets start with the cam bearings. Got a set of 0.002" undersize cam bearings from Norm Meinert.



I've been told when installing cam bearings, as long as you have half the hole lined up you should be fine. As OCD as I am, that will never happen. (By the way, it should be called CDO, that way the letters are in the correct order).

So, what I do, is to take a square and draw a line through the holes in the block and the holes in the bearing. That way, you just align the lines and drive them home, so the holes line up no matter what kind of goofy angle you are driving them from.









O.K., all set. Pop them babies in the freezer for a half an hour, and they will slide right home.

Per the manual, the middle bearing gets centered in the web of the block. I drew that one in with the puller. Oil hole location came out good.



The front one should be flush with the front of the block. This one came out good too.



The rear one should be flush with the expansion plug bore. Oil hole looks good.



Picked up a 2 1/2" welch plug. Use a Q tip to put a little anaerobic sealer on the plug and the bore, being careful to keep it away from the drain hole. If you inadvertently plug that drain hole, I'd imagine the oil pressure would hydraulically pop that plug right out.



Tap the plug into the bore, then give it one good whack to distort it a little, should be good.



I couldn't get a picture while I was doing it, but I looked in from the front of the motor and stuck this wire back there to make sure the hole is clear- O.K.



Couldn't find a spec for lifter or bore diameter, so in they go. I have been told that Lubriplate will clog an oil filter, but I have no idea how long this engine is going to sit before it runs, so I will use it sparingly. Probably going to run the engine up to temp to set the valves and will change oil then anyways.





So there. Enough for now, I set the block on corrosion resistant paper, throw a layer on top, and cover it with plastic when I'm not working on it. That damn OCD, I mean CDO.



Thanks for looking!






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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Allis dave Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Feb 2016 at 7:29am
Thanks Marv, looks like a good start. Wish I could set and work on mine next to the stove.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Don(MO) Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Feb 2016 at 9:07am
Looks like you are going at it right, keep up the good work and post more on your engine rebuild.
3 WD45's with power steering,G,D15 fork lift,D19, W-Speed Patrol, "A" Gleaner with a 330 corn head,"66" combine,roto-baler, and lots of Snap Coupler implements to make them work for their keep.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote littlemarv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Feb 2016 at 1:06am
The nice thing about the parts manual is it gives you exact sizes of all the bolts. Got three new bolts and lockwashers, torqued the cam gear on.

Alright sonny boy, lets get a little grease on your hands.





Watched Dons video on the rear main seal again to brush up on it. Before he made that video, he actually talked me through the process over the phone a couple years ago.

Set this on the rear main seal for an hour, just for everyones benefit, it does not work. You have to compress them in a vise to really get them thin.



Cleaned and trued up the upper rear main carrier. You can see when I started sanding the only contact was around the bolt holes.



Got it cleaned up nice.




So, bolted that on, glue the upper half in, lubed the seal with oil and the bearings with Lubriplate, and set the crank home.






The manual says anything under 0.011" end play is acceptable. I've got about 0.003" on the crank.

Laid the engine over on its side for cylinder kit installation.




Got these Tisco kits with the tractor.




Slid one in without the O-rings to check liner protrusion. Don't have my good gauge here, so I checked it with my dial calipers. Manual says 0.002" to 0.004" is O.K., I come up with 0.003". Sweet.



Oh yeah, pulled the oil wick out of the crank and plugged both ends with a cork, since I will be using a sealed pilot bearing.





I really thought about taking down my "tractor table" and putting an engine stand down here, but this table is too darn handy. I originally built it to work on a garden tractor during the winter.



Since then, I have restored one garden tractor on it, fixed about 20 other garden tractor parts, rebuilt one two cylinder Kohler, built a doll house, painted a bunch of parts, and done umpteen other projects on it. What you don't see in these engine build pictures, is the fact that I had to shove my stuff into a pile so SOMEONE could work on a wooden model....



What can I say.

Thanks for looking!












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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AaronSEIA Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Feb 2016 at 6:33am
Nice work.  Good job getting the kids involved.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ac45dave Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Feb 2016 at 8:01am
lookin good bud. keep the updates coming.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mjbower Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Feb 2016 at 8:11am
Love the attention to details there. And getting the youth involved.thanks for the pictures
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hubnut Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Feb 2016 at 8:11am
Nice pictures.  I learned a few things here.  If you use the freezer technique for the cam bearings, do they slide right in by hand, or do you still need the installer to drive them in properly?  Just curious because those tools are rather expensive and I've always had the machine shop do the cam bearings.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote littlemarv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Feb 2016 at 8:19am
No, they definitely do not slide in by hand! Just a figure of speech that I guess maybe I should not have used. With anything press fit, throwing the inner part in the freezer makes things go a little easier. I think if a cam bearing ever went in by hand, it would spin pretty quick once the motor was run.





Edited by littlemarv - 21 Feb 2016 at 8:34am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hubnut Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Feb 2016 at 11:22am
Thank you--makes sense.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SteveM C/IL Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Feb 2016 at 1:06pm
It probably don't matter on this engine but those liners should be clamped down to measure projection.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote littlemarv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Feb 2016 at 1:13pm
Yes, checking it with the dial indicator isn't the most accurate. I'm going to flip the block upright when I actually install them.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote littlemarv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Feb 2016 at 10:54pm
Tried my hand at safety wiring, looks O.K. I guess, without having a pair of twisting pliers.



Brought home my good gauges, so I can measure things properly. Crank end play came out at 0.004", so good to go there.



Flipped the block upright, plunked the liners in with no O-rings. I'm getting 0.005" or 0.006" protrusion. Hmmmmmm.

After a conference call with Don(MO), I scraped the counter bores with a razor blade, actually got a little crud out of there....

Much better.



Put Vaseline on the lower lead in chamfers, put canola oil on the O-rings. Should be a slippery enough combination.



Put the liners in, give them a spin at the end to ease the O-rings down into place. Hopefully these liners have found their new home for the next 50 years or so....



Thanks for looking!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote B26240 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Feb 2016 at 9:17am
Looks great Marv, love it you got your son helping, one big thing he will learn from you is no dirt allowed!   As for getting it out of the basement is they make a two wheel cart with "stair climbing ability" maybe you can rent one from a rental outfit?   Guy in the neighborhood who sells and installs wood stoves has one and he uses it on stoves weighing in the 450# range. Thanks for the update.      Mark
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote littlemarv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Feb 2016 at 11:31pm
Junior taking care of a little body work,



"Connecting rods with Courtney"





And the old man on pistons.



Found a universal ring compressor that should work. These are Conformatic aluminum pistons, no long bosses, and no arrows. Well, they have arrows now, so the pistons all go in the same way.


Got the pistons on the rods per the manual. Kind of neat how you do it, depending on which number cylinder it is, you push the pin to one side of the piston, then push the rod the same way. Torque the pinch bolt to 35 ft. lbs., then slide it away about 1/8". Then the pin is pretty much centered when the rod is offset.










These were the first wrist pins I have ever installed that didn't have snap rings, so I was a little worried about keeping the wrist pins away from the cylinder walls. Cause if you make a mistake there, you are starting all over. But, looks like it should work.





Here's where I really could use an engine stand. Put it up on blocks a little higher, made a disposable drain pan out of tinfoil, and stuck some towels under there to catch all the drips.






My teacher in overhaul class at tech school taught me to soak pistons completely in oil prior to installation. You can't get much more complete lubrication than that. It is a bit messy, but its the only way I've ever done it.








Just snugged the rod bolts with a ratchet for now. I'm going to let it drip overnight, then I will flip it up so I can torque the rod bolts.





After I got them all in, just for kicks, checked the rolling torque. I don't think there is a spec, but we can file this away in the "useless info" category. Averaged 250 inch pounds, more or less.






Ironic- the torque wrench probably cost more new than the tractor....



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Allis dave Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Feb 2016 at 7:11am
Great once again. This is a good guide for me to follow when assembling my 226 soon (maybe soon)...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bill_MN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Feb 2016 at 9:26am
Looking great, just a couple points- you should not put any oil or petroleum based lubricants on those o-rings, it will cause the rubber to swell and actually distort the liners believe it or not. Clean the bore and sleeve to an inch of it's life and use a little dish soap only, it is plenty slippery and when it dries up it actually causes them to stick to the sides of the bore sealing them better. I'm a bit concerned about the safety wire on the left, doesn't look like it's tied together?? The proper way is to do a figure 8 between the bolt heads so if one bolt loosens, the other bolt turns the opposite way and tightens. Not trying to be critical, just don't want anything to ruin that beautiful rebuild Smile 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote littlemarv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Feb 2016 at 11:05pm
The safety wire on the left is twisted, you just can't see it due to the oil drain hole in the main cap. It would be a lot easier if there were three sets of holes instead of just one in each bolt. I couldn't do a nice neat figure 8 on the end ones, but it will work perfect on the middle one.

I think the liner O-rings will be alright. It says in the instructions to use oil on them. I've used dish soap, vegetable oil, engine oil, and even coolant for assembly on various engines. I know if you TWIST an o-ring, it can distort a liner.




So, laid the block down, torqued the rod bolts to 40 ft.lbs. and installed cotter pins, checked for rod side clearance, good to go there. Redid the safety wire on the middle cap as well.




So there, on to the cylinder head. Got a little thinking to do here, as I have the 3" head, which would be CORRECT for the age of tractor, and, I have a 4" head, which is a later vintage with some design improvements. Either way, a cleaning, pressure testing, decking, valve train kit, and valve job is pretty much in order. I have the rockers and pedestals for each. I guess it boils down to CORRECT or IMPROVED DESIGN. You can see how they moved the spark plugs toward the center of the chamber on the thicker head.




Hmmmmmmm.....











Edited by littlemarv - 26 Feb 2016 at 11:06pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Allis dave Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Feb 2016 at 7:31am
Going from memory reading the service manual a few days ago. I think the castle nut rod bolt are supposed to be torqued to 70ft/lb and the newer self locking nuts are 40ft/lb
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CAL(KS) Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Feb 2016 at 8:49am
per an older discussion in pulling forum,  no noticable gain from taller head, besides maby for high flow porting applications.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote littlemarv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Feb 2016 at 2:20pm
Well, I guess I will have to do a little research, cause rod bolts are something you need to be sure about. 70 sure sounds like a lot for those little bolts..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote B26240 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Feb 2016 at 2:45pm
Marv did you use any plastigauge to check bearing clearance? Mark
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote littlemarv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Feb 2016 at 3:06pm
No, with having it line bored and the rods sized to eliminate shims, theres nothing I can do about it anyways....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dawntreader74 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Feb 2016 at 7:56pm
the small bolts are 25- to 30 in the old book'' ac-wc.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ac45dave Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Feb 2016 at 9:32pm
Originally posted by littlemarv littlemarv wrote:

No, with having it line bored and the rods sized to eliminate shims, theres nothing I can do about it anyways....
think i would check with plastigauge just to make sure the machine shop did there stuff right.ya just never know when some body can have a bad day not getting things right.hopefuly not on your project.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Alex09(WI) Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Mar 2016 at 12:53am
Great job on the rebuild, looks like a quality job! I have also read 70 lbs for castleated nuts. Good choice to see you going with castleated nuts instead of self locking. I have seen the self locking nuts let go and put a hole in the block. Good luck with the rest.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Stan IL&TN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Mar 2016 at 7:17am
You are doing it right but one thing is bugging me.  How the heck do you get it out of the basement? Big smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote B26240 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Mar 2016 at 11:08am
Stan I am wondering that also but maybe he has some big friends, if you read my earlier post I suggested renting a stair climbing dolly, neighbor has one he uses to haul wood stoves in the 450# range up stairs when he sells them. I saw him use it this winter, it has a battery on it and went right up the steps with a wood stove no problem. With all the good pictures Marv is sharing I expect on of it going up the stairs !!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote littlemarv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Mar 2016 at 12:17am
Well, after doing a little research and talking to several people on the connecting rod bolt torque, here is what I have come up with. This is a theory, NOT fact.

The castle nuts got torqued to 70 foot pounds. They were cranked down so tight because the rods were shimmed with soft brass shims, and if the shims ever fretted out and your rod caps start clunking around, all hell was gonna break loose pretty quick.

With the introduction of sized rods and precision insert bearings, the self locking nuts could be torqued to 40 ft. lbs. only. Really, there isn't any stress per say on a rod bolt, other than actually pulling the piston down on the intake stroke.

I think 70 ft. lbs. is a lot, even for a new 7/16" fine thread fastener. I'm not going to put that on bolts that are this old.

So, here's what I did. Pulled the cotter pins out, loosened the rod bolts, torqued them to 50 foot pounds, and turned them whichever way was closest to get a new cotter pin in.

Installed the timing cover seal, I always pack the backside of the seal with something if it has a garter spring in it. On axles you can use regular grease, on engines I use Lubriplate.



I was going to make a sleeve to locate the front cover like Don said in his video, but since I can flip the engine up, I just installed the seal in the cover, and slid the cover into place, it should be about as centered as you can get...




I happen to have two covers. Took the cam plugs out of both. One is stuck tight, the other one moves but has no spring tension behind it. Took them both apart, and took the best pieces to make one good one.







Tightened the plug down, back it off 3/4 of a turn, and lock down the jam nut.

Cleaned up the head studs and put them in. Waiting for the machine shop to give the head a once over. I took the valves out, they look pretty good, and the stems measure good.






With every part I bolt on, I grin a little. Two reasons:

1. I'm getting closer to driving a tractor that I built.
2. Gives me more room on my bench for more junk! (Carb and mag both need a good going through)

Concerned about how I'm going to get the engine out of the basement, eh? Oh, don't worry, that little spectacle won't go undocumented, trust me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote B26240 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Mar 2016 at 6:19am
Fun watching your steady progress, and good work you are doing.    Mark
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